Translating Thucydides’ Archaeology

Translation is a tricky thing. Whenever I read a text, especially one in a language like ancient Greek, I try to aim for as literal a translation as possible. I know, I know. It results in hideously unenglish sentences and is painful to both eye and ear. Yet this is how I find it easier…

Plato On Traditional Values

Here are a few of my thoughts reflecting on Open Learn’s short online course on Plato’s Laches. Plato uses his dialogue Laches to question traditional beliefs and decide whether they have any real merit. The usual justifications that people give for holding them are either (a) that they are shared by a community or (b) that…

Ελλάδα

Have a read of some poetry I wrote. An epic tragicomedy concerning Greek myth’s Generation Ω  in the stanza of Edmund Spencer. 1. Let present day fancies tell proud story, Days of yore fond embattled angst, Of olden times regaled in glory, Far-sighted Aegean heroes glanced, Heroines enchanting beauty danced, Feelings full of another moral…

Democritus’ Tradition.

(or on what it means to be a “pagan” today.) “All this is well and admirably told. It is, however, far removed from truth. For perfect peace gods by their very nature Must of necessity enjoy, and immortal life, Far separate, far removed from our affairs. For free from every sorrow, every danger, Strong in…

Nirvana / Deleuze: Bodies Without Organs

Looking into the interesting parallels between Kurt Cobain’s music and Gille Deleuze’s philosophy. “As my bones grew they did hurt, they hurt really bad…” Listening in hindsight to Nirvana’s In Utero kick off with Serve the Servants brings to mind the notion that it could not have started in any other way. It is one…

The Life & Death of Ancient Science

Thales is considered to be the first person who followed the scientific method. He lived in Miletus, Asia Minor from 624 to 546BCE. In his times it was common to think that the gods were responsible for all geological activity and weather. Earthquakes and tsunamis were attributed to Poseidon while Zeus was thought to be…

The Threefold Goddess

Introduction: “In order to be satisfied what is true religion, we must go up to the fountain-head as much as possible. The first religion undoubtedly is true, as coming immediately from God.” So begins William Stukeley in the preface to his Abury – A Temple of The British Druids (1742). Stukeley, an antiquarian who anticipated…

Hermes’ Lyre

Along with my advancing philology and classical studies I have been learning to play the ancient Greek lyre for the last two years, which has helped me to get deeper into the mood when facing original Greek texts. The following is my “musicians statement” of sorts, detailing how I came to the classical Greek lyre:…

Ode to Venus

My poem to the goddess of love in the stanza of Spencer. 1. Her dark eyes speak of a deep madness That fulfills itself through burning lust; Breaking free from a painful sadness, Their inner nature which desperately must Unite the elements until reduced to dust When only true feelings survive this plain; Love’s essence…

Tekton

What was Jesus’ job? As with many New Testament studies, we should be wary of translations and go back to the original Greek. “Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon?” – King James Bible, St. Mark, 6.3 The word used in the…

The Realm of Somethingness.

I was getting back into the whole existentialist concept of being and consciousness studies and produced these sporadic notes. Whether I get round to putting them together into a more coherent article remains to be seen but they work quite well as a collection of thoughts and aphorisms which hopefully will be thought provoking or…

Translating Agathon’s Panegyric in Praise of Love.

Here’s my attempt at translating some key extracts from Agathon’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. I should apologise in advanced for the lack of proper accentuation in the Greek as I haven’t been able to get an ancient Greek polytonic keyboard on my computer (yet.) Well then, here goes… 1. Φημί ουν εγώ πάντων θεων ευδαιμόνων…